Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Calling All Dear Abbys - Advice Needed!





by Kath Rutledge from the Haunted Yarn Shop Mysteries

(Read on for a chance to win in the Killer Characters Cozy Days of Summer giveaway!) 


If you’ve met my friend Geneva, then you know that she’s . . . unusual. To say the least. Because she’s a ghost.  Beyond that fact, I don’t know much about her. She claims she doesn’t remember much about her life and she gets upset if I press her to try. From her reaction to the deaths of a young couple earlier this year, there was clearly something traumatic in her own background that she’s blocking out. Her memory, otherwise, especially for dialogue and plot lines from fifty-year-old television shows, is unbeatable. But I’m always looking for historical details she knew firsthand that might help pinpoint when she lived. Here’s a conversation I had with her recently about the reenactment J. Scott Prescott is planning for next weekend.

“So, have you ever heard of this feud Mr. Prescott was talking about?” I asked. “He’s calling it the ‘The Blue Plum Piglet War.’ It happened sometime in the 1820s or 1830s during a boundary dispute that escalated when one guy let his pigs get into another guy’s crops.”

“What was he growing?” Geneva asked.

“Something tasty to pigs. I don’t know. Potatoes?”

“Potatoes, pigs, and pandemonium,” she said with relish.

“Do you remember it?” I asked.

“I’m not that old.”

“Well, no, I didn’t think you were, but people have always told stories about it. My grandmother told them to me. Maybe your grandmother told them to you. Maybe she was there. Anyway, you might be interested in watching the reenactment next weekend.”

“I’m more interested in your reenactment. You do the same thing every time.”

“And what are we talking about now?”

“The way you rebuff every gentleman caller who shows the least bit of interest in you. Mr. J. Snot Big Shot. He was full of himself, but I saw the way he took your hand.”

“That is absolute baloney.”

“It’s not. He’s sweet on you and you spurned his advance.” Her voice throbbed with pathos for J. Scott.

“I spurned his attempt to put good old boys with guns in our upstairs window and his advance on the building. He’s a slick salesman. He doesn’t give a flying fig about me.”

“No one would with that attitude.”

“My attitude is fine.”

“For a nun.”

My outer thirty-nine-year-old was willing to pick up a dust rag and move away from that jab. But that went against everything my inner seven-year-old stands for. “Joe,” I snapped. “For your information, I don’t rebuff Joe. We’re having dinner tomorrow night at Mel’s.”

“We are?”

“Not you. Joe and I.”

“And there you go.” She threw her wispy hands in the air. “Rebuffing again. But never mind. Loneliness is my lot in death. I’ll never understand your need to exclude a lost soul from the warmth and gaiety of a simple dinner out. But I’ll survive.”

Sigh. I think I could use a few tips for getting along with a melodramatic, histrionic, finicky, persnickety creature, don't you? (And doesn’t it seem like I just described a cat or a teenager?) If you have any suggestions for me, leave them in a comment. I’ll be so grateful!

Leave your advice or a comment by midnight 7/23/14 for a chance to win an audiobook of a Haunted Yarn Shop  Mystery – your choice of LAST WOOL AND TESTAMENT, DYEING WISHES, or SPINNING IN HER GRAVE. Be sure to leave your email address in the comment to be notified in case you are the winner.


Kath Rutledge’s latest adventure is the national bestselling SPINNING IN HER GRAVE, third book in the award-winning Haunted Yarn Shop Mysteries, which are available in mass market, e-book, large print, and audio wherever books are sold.  Watch for Kath in PLAGUED BY QUILT, coming in November 2014, and available now for pre-order.

Visit Molly MacRae on Facebook and Pinterest, or find her the first Monday of each month at Vintage Cookbooks and Crafts



42 comments:

  1. Ghost and cats have one major similarity No one can control them in any way. Your best bet is to take a deep breath, hold your tongue and hope they see they see things your way more often than not. Good luck!

    DelAnne
    InspirationalAngel@hotmail.com

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  2. I have succeeded for several years now. A good sense of humor nad do not take anything seriously.
    debby236 at gmail dot com

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  3. She's set in her own ways, I don't have any good advice but to try and take things with a grain of salt and a good sense of humor. dbahn@iw.net

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  4. Don't usually read "haunted" stories but this one sounds pretty good. I don't have any suggestions - I have a persnickity dog and she pretty well rules the dog house so I wouldn't be the one to give advice on taming on "problem".
    txmlhl@yahoo.com

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  5. I think a sense of humor would help.

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  6. Give Geneva a ghost of her own to deal with.

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  7. I imagine it would be really difficult especially if one's ghost wasn't limited to one location (so you can get away). I agree with Sandy, try to have a sense of humor about it.

    acm05atjuno.com

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  8. I agree, patience and a sense of humor will help you get through it. Thanks for the opportunity to win # 3!
    annelovell12@yahoo.com

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  9. I have a friend who had to deal with a ghost while re-habbing an old old railroad depot...every time she went up and down the stairs, she felt a draft of chilly air..and a slight hand on her shoulder...as if to push. She finally decided to invite the ghost to tea. Yep. Cookies and biscuits and jam. On the stairs. Then she thanked the entity for allowing her to make the building beautiful again...she was restoring it, old wood and all...and to let her know she was always welcome, on the stairs and elsewhere. My friend swears the ghost is still there, but the draft is a bit warmer. Who knows? A tea party just might be a temporary fix :o)

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  10. I agree with everyone else. A sense of humor and patience should help.

    Agavigan@cox.net

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  11. Take your time and have patience and best of luck. elliotbencan(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  12. I wonder what she would do if invited along on the dinner date?
    libbydodd at comcast dot net

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  13. It depends - do you want the ghost to go away and leave you alone? Usually simply announcing that "this is MY home and you're not welcome here" does the trick. If not, you can smudge with sage or use rock salt to repel spirits.
    If you want to keep the ghost (and I assume you do since she's a main character in your story) then I'd suggest dealing with her the way you deal with a whiny living person - you either grin and bear it (find a way to laugh) or you tell the person to suck it up already! Don't let her pull the old "I'm-so-pathetic-and-dead-and-you-hurt-my-feelings" guilt trip on you either. :)

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  14. have patience

    bn100candg at hotmail dot com

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  15. Love the excerpt! Raquel36m(at)gmail(dot)com

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  16. Look at it this way, you'll always have someone to talk to.
    kim j
    Kjohnson952@yahoo.com

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  17. Maybe you could find her a nice man ghost to keep her happy. :)
    momzillasteel at gmail dot com

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  18. A good sense of humor helps.

    Kit3247(at)aol(dot)com

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  19. Love these books! poor Geneva, all you can do is grin and bear it (and keep lifetime tv movies off). ColleenMvotour at yahoo dot com

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  20. Always pretend to pay attention and give respect. You don't have to do what she says. suefoster109@netzero.net

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  21. Sorry if this is a duplicate post - I commented earlier and it didn't show up, so I'm going to give it another shot. I like all the suggestions here - patience, a sense of humor and a cup of tea. I would also add a touch of bribery - as a last resort, it always worked with my kids. Particularly if chocolate was involved! (Or in my son's case, gummy bears!)

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  22. Look at it as an adventure! Sounds like a great read.

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  23. I would let her come to dinner more often! Could be fun!
    misstree1963@gmail.com

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  24. I have found that the only place that I can stand ghosts is in cozies. Maybe it is because they are much nicer there!

    CarolNWong(at)aol(dot)com

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  25. Sometimes it's just better to let others vent. Go enjoy your dinner :) areewekidding@yahoo.com

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  26. I'd love to win here. Haven't had any luck so far. I like cozies with ghosts in them.
    catbooks72(at)gmail(dot)com

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  27. Lol...I would let her go along with you to dinner - she'll either get bored listening in on the date or she'll become fascinated with something or someone in the restaurant and leave you alone to enjoy the date.

    Thanks for the giveaway

    maria63303 at gmail dot com

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  28. Ghosts are fun in cozies---they add a little atmosphere.
    suefarrell.farrell@gmail.com

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  29. Take her to dinner. She needs a break from the yarn shop!
    Sounds like a great cozy.
    Sandra M
    sa7mrt@aol.com

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  30. Good luck! I hate histrionics. Have a drink-maybe ask her her favorite cocktails.

    cozyupwithkathy at gmail dot com

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  31. Sounds like an interesting book.
    Patti.s@comcast.net

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  32. I love listening to a great book while I am sewing, so this would be fantastic!
    lovelystitches @ live dot com

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  33. Give her one new thing that is hers - a fish, plant, perfume, framed James Dean photo. And teach her how to put on the kettle, nothing helps with melodrama like a cup of tea, with or without a quick shot.

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  34. Not having any personal experience with ghosts, I really don't know what to say.She does seem a big sensitive, so continue being nice to her and maybe she'll finally open up about her past life.

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  35. A ginger scented candle to go along with the ginger colored kitty might keep her mellow and talking about her past more - her mamma's kitchen and all that has gone on before. Or begin baking in the kitchen where she can feel at home and will have more company from the shop with the wonderful scents wafting through the Weaver's Cat.

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  36. Set up an area that contains things she likes.

    jtcgc at yahoo dot com

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  37. Have sense of humor and patience.
    rjprazak6@gmail.com
    Becky Prazak

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  38. I don't have any advice. I have a hard time with melodrama. I try to avoid people like that. Sorry.

    ElaineE246(at)msn(dot)com

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  39. I don't really have any advice. Count to ten. Try to not take it to seriously. Pick your battles. Standard stuff.
    lkish77123 at gmail dot com

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  40. I think I am inclined to agree, ghosts and cats... best of luck!
    - lavendersbluegreen(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  41. I love the books with ghosts. I try to avoid the melodrama.
    Lisa
    hseaside5@aim.com

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