Sunday, December 27, 2015

The Best Job in the World

The Best Job in the World
by Detective Michael Tracy, from the Spice Shop Mysteries by Leslie Budewitz

I love my job. Homicide, Seattle P.D., going on twenty years. If it didn’t sound so boastful, I would say I was born to do this: to investigate, to probe, to bring the worst of the worst to justice. But it’s exhilarating, in a way, solving crimes and making this great city of Seattle even better.

I will admit, the job does get rough sometimes, and this case—well, this one was just plain baffling. Tamara Langston, age 32, young chef with aspirations of running her own joint. More than aspirations—she had a building, a plan, and a partner.

But—and this was particularly weird—no history. It was as if the woman just sprang to life, so to speak, when she turned up dead.

And then, that darned Pepper Reece got involved again. Well, involved from the start—she found the body. And I had a hunch she wasn’t telling us everything. My partner, Detective Cheryl Spencer, says I’m just put out because Pepper solved a crime last fall when we couldn’t. There’s a bit of truth to that—nobody likes getting shown up, especially by Jane Q. Public.

Pepper ought to know better than to stick her nose into police business—after all, she was married to a cop for I don’t know how long. Although considering who she was married to—well, we just won’t go there. Detective Spencer has this look she gives me that says I’m letting my personal stuff interfere with the job, and even though she isn’t here right now, while I’m talking to you, I can feel her giving me that look.

It’s not one you forget. Just like this case. All kinds of twists and turns, and some of that personal stuff tossed in.

But I still love this job. If I ever stop loving it, that will be the day I quit.

What’s the best job you’ve ever had?

GUILTY AS CINNAMON (Spice Shop Mystery #2, December 1, Berkley Prime Crime)

From the cover ...

Pepper Reece knows that fiery flavors are the spice of life. But when a customer dies of a chili overdose, she finds herself in hot pursuit of a murderer…

Murder heats up Seattle’s Pike Place Market in the next Spice Shop mystery from the national bestselling author of Assault and Pepper.

Springtime in Seattle’s Pike Place Market means tasty foods and wide-eyed tourists, and Pepper’s Seattle Spice Shop is ready for the crowds. With flavorful combinations and a fresh approach, she’s sure to win over the public. Even better, she’s working with several local restaurants as their chief herb and spice supplier. Business is cooking, until one of Pepper’s potential clients, a young chef named Tamara Langston, is found dead, her life extinguished by the dangerously hot ghost chili—a spice Pepper carries in her shop.

Now stuck in the middle of a heated police investigation, Pepper must use all her senses to find out who wanted to keep Tamara’s new cafĂ© from opening—before someone else gets burned…

— 


Leslie Budewitz is the author of the Food Lovers’ Village Mysteries and the Spice Shop Mysteries—and the first author to win Agatha Awards for both fiction and nonfiction. She fell in love with the Pike Place Market as a college student in Seattle, and still makes regular pilgrimages. The president of Sisters in Crime, she lives in northwest Montana with her husband, a musician and doctor of natural medicine, and their cat Ruff, a cover model and avid bird-watcher. 

Connect with her through her website and blog,  or on Facebook. 

14 comments:

  1. Raising my daughter Haylee was the best job I ever had, but owning a yarn shop next door to Haylee's fabric shop in Threadville where friends own other crafty shops is a close second!

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  2. Teaching, sharing with others and seeing them become enthused and make advancements, grow and mature. Love this blurb. Would love to read.
    Della at deepotter@peoplepc.com

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  3. I've had some interesting jobs...production assistant in stage management, caddie and bag room worker at a country club, going door to door for environmental causes, apartment management, preboard screener at an airport, police officer, security hospital senior treatment assistant and now I'm a rehabilitation counselor as well as an independent consultant with Pink Zebra.

    I had great fun in all my jobs-I really enjoyed working at the airport-but that was eons ago-and I made minimum wage-back then, less than $5 an hour! My current job is probably my favorite. I work with forensic patients, and although the focus is vocational rehabilitation, I run my Arts group where I share my love for opera and other art forms.

    cozyupwithkathy @ gmail dot com

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  4. Both good ones! I loved helping people as a lawyer, and learning new things, but writing mysteries is my favorite job ever!

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  5. When I was 16 my first "real" job was as a food and beverage cashier in a hotel. I worked with a model, a dwarf, a guy who wore makeup and had long polished nails, yet had a full beard and so on. It was a unique experience and every day was something new.

    acm05atjuno.com

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    1. Sounds like a great job for a kid, introducing you to all variety of people and experiences. I love my first real job in a bookstore for the same reasons. And the books!

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  6. I worked in international shipping. That was my best job. When I think back, I believe it was the people I worked with more than the job. Sounds like a great book!

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    1. They make all the difference, don't they?

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  7. The best job I ever had was as home staff in a facility for adults with MR/DD (mental retardation and developmental disabilities). I felt like a made a difference. I spent 4 years there, and went to the hospital numerous times from intervening when residents were trying to hurt themselves or each other. But I would still advocate for any of the residents. The home and classroom staff were mostly good as well. It was the administration and the so-called 'professionals' that killed the joy for me. (I had spent 45+ years as a non-smoker before starting there and still have that monkey on my back.)

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    1. Oh, LuAnn -- thank heavens jobs that look impossibly tough to many of us are just right for people like you.

      As for the monkey, consider acupuncture.

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  8. My best job ever was, can you guess it?, working in a bookstore! It was like Christmas every day, and when I closed at night, it was just me and the books!

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    1. Yes! My first real job was in the Waldenbooks in Rimrock Mall in Billings, and I adored it. If I weren't so committed to writing, I might have sought out an investor/partner and opened a bookstore in the valley when Borders closed. One boon of writing is getting to visit so many wonderful bookstores!

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  9. Well I liked my first job at 12 yrs old , working in a small bakery for a Italian lady. I also worked at a day care = the part I enjoyed there was when kids come running up to you letting you know they are so glad you are there for them.

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    1. Both sound delightful, Ann -- thanks for the fun images!

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