Sunday, March 27, 2016

by Seetha Sharma, from the Spice Shop Mysteries by Leslie Budewitz

Seattle. Doesn’t the name sound romantic and mysterious? I always thought so, as a kid in Boston. Why I became so fascinated with the place, I have no idea. No one from my family had ever been there, and I didn’t know anyone from there, until one of my dad’s grad students—he teaches engineering at MIT—came over for dinner. She talked about Seattle, and I couldn’t stop listening. She talked about the water—it’s everywhere, the Sound, the lakes, the canals. The rain. And the parks—there’s one on the site of an abandoned gasworks company, another with an old-growth forest in the middle, and one that stretches over the freeway. She told me about Seattle Center, where the Space Needle is, and all the festivals and concerts and other amazing things there. And about the mountains, so clear and close.

And I fell in love with the city, sight unseen.

So when I needed to leave, Seattle was the obvious choice. Pepper says there’s a long history of people moving to here because it’s as far as you can go and stay in the country unless you’re willing to go to Alaska. I’m not sure she knows how on the mark she is.

I knew the minute I drove down Snoqualmie Pass that I was home. Then I met Laurel at a yoga class, and she invited me to the Flick Chicks—her weekly movie get-together with Pepper and Kristen. Never in my life had I felt so welcome as when I walked onto Laurel’s houseboat for my first Tuesday night with them—never, until the next week at Pepper’s and the week after at Kristen’s.

They call Seattle the Emerald City, because the rain makes everything so green. Dorothy couldn’t wait to leave the Emerald City and go home.

But the Emerald City is home to me. Home isn’t just a place. It’s the people you meet there, and how they make you feel, inside.

What says “home” to you? 


Leslie Budewitz is the author of the Food Lovers’ Village Mysteries and the Spice Shop Mysteries—and the first author to win Agatha Awards for both fiction and nonfiction. The president of Sisters in Crime, she lives in northwest Montana with her husband, a musician and doctor of natural medicine, and their cat Ruff, a cover model and avid bird-watcher. 

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8 comments:

  1. I totally agree. Home is where your best friends are. That could include family. Do I sound wistful?

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  2. New England. I wanted to be there long before I really knew what it was. And Ireland, of course, even though I didn't know how much it would feel like "home."

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    1. Twice? You lucky woman, you!

      Like Seetha, I was drawn to Seattle long before I visited, but am lucky now to live in western Montanan -- the other end of the state where I grew up -- and there is no question it's home!

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  3. Home is New York City. Always was, always will be. Like Sheila, I've been to Ireland a few times and am constantly surprised at the sense of "home" I have when I am there. I am hoping to have a family trip with all the grandkids to Ireland one day.

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    1. Terrie, that trip sounds fabulous!

      Mr. Right and I have had similar experiences in small mountain towns in other countries -- Greece, France, Mexico, and of course, our neighboring Canada. The atmosphere and geography just hold us.

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  4. I don't have a good answer for that right now. I think I will go crawl into a home in a book...

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    1. Elaine, some of the very best homes are on the page!

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