Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Being the New Kid Can Be Deadly

by Meg Corey Chapin and Seth Chapin, from A Late Frost (Orchard Mystery #11) by Sheila Connolly


“I feel guilty, not doing anything,” Meg Corey (she was still trying to get used to using Seth’s last name Chapin) said, stirring her coffee.

“You’re not doing nothing,” new husband Seth Chapin told her firmly. “You’re conserving energy for the coming season. Right now your apple trees are resting, and so should you. You’ll be more than busy enough in a month or so, so enjoy your time off.”

“I’m trying.” Meg sighed and forked up some of Seth’s pancakes with local maple syrup. “How are the plans for WinterFare coming along?”

“We’re good to go,” Seth told her. “The high school gym is booked, and we've got plenty of vendors to fill it. Monica Whitman has really thrown herself into the project and pulled it all together. She’s definitely an asset to the Granford community.”

The orchard in winter
“I sympathize with her. I remember when I first arrived in Granford—I didn’t know anybody, I had no idea what I was doing, and then there was that problem with the body of my ex-boyfriend in the septic tank. Did you really think I’d killed him?”

Seth smiled. “Well, you were the obvious suspect, and it was your septic tank. But I didn’t know you then. Clearly you couldn’t kill anyone.”

Meg smiled back. “I’m glad you noticed. I can’t even kill spiders. But I understand where you were coming from then. You were protecting Granford, because it’s your home and you are an elected official of the town. I came in a distant third.”

“It’s your home too now. Isn’t it?”

“Of course it is. Believe me, I understand. I think Monica is smart, finding a way to meet as many people as possible quickly. And I love the idea of a festival at this dreary time of year, and I’m sure people will welcome the chance to get together and talk and enjoy local foods and crafts.”

“So we all owe Monica a vote of thanks. It’s going to be a great event,” Seth said.


And so it was—until something went very wrong. You’ll have to read A Late Frost to find out what happens, but here’s your chance: leave a comment about being a newcomer by midnight on Thursday and I’ll draw a name to win a copy of A Late Frost (yes, I have copies already!) before it’s released on November 7th.

Or you can order it at Amazon or Barnes and Noble

www.sheilaconnolly.com


31 comments:

  1. I came to iowa 15 years ago and joined the newcomers group but the funny thing is that they were already a click within themselves and that made me mad they weren't open to a new person from sf,ca and so i quit. Thank you for the chance. ptclayton2@aol.com

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  2. I was often a newcomer as a child. Being an Army Brat means you move often. Now it no longer bothers me.
    debby236 at gmail dot com

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  3. I grew up on a farm and so attended country school. When it came time to attend high school, most of us "country kids" were newcomers. Overall, I would say, the city kids weren't really open to having new friends. They were already in their own groups, so most of the country kids formed their own groups. dbahn(at)iw(dot)net

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  4. I lived in a different district from the high school I attended and I entered as a Sophomore. I did know one person there but didn't find that out till months after the school year started. I was also a band geek and had to make friends with everyone who'd already had a year to meld into a cohesive group. The person I knew was someone I knew from my very old neighborhood in the East New York section of Brooklyn. We hadn't seen each other in 3 or 4 years.

    I'm not very outgoing so this was sort of Mission Impossible for me.

    NoraAdrienne (at) gmail (dot) com

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  5. Your books are wonderful reads.
    libbydodd at comcast dot net

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  6. Being a newcomers used to be daunting but it doesn't bother me at all now as I am older. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

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  7. Ignoring, accepting and adapting. elliotbencan(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  8. We moved to Maryland 10 years ago, and I still haven't met a lot of people. But I'm happy with my family and pets. lndklbck at gmail dot com

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  9. after I had twins I moved to a tiny town in Ohio. It was so weird coming from country town to city town. I did all right there for about 2 yrs then decided to come back home. Thank you for the chance. bsmiley6918(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  10. After I was married, my husband and I moved to a small town in Illinois. We mostly made friends with people from the company he worked with and not the locals. They weren't very accepting of all the people that his company was bringing into town. Two years later we moved to Chicago and I found the people here much more friendly and helpful.
    diannekc8(at)gmail(dot)com

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  11. After I was married, my husband and I moved to a small town in Illinois. We mostly made friends with people from the company he worked with and not the locals. They weren't very accepting of all the people that his company was bringing into town. Two years later we moved to Chicago and I found the people here much more friendly and helpful.
    diannekc8(at)gmail(dot)com

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  12. After college, I moved from a smaller town across the country to Los Angeles. Talk about a completely different environment.
    turtle6422(at)gmail(dot)com

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  13. We moved to a small town when my hubby retired 25 years ago----and the locals still make us feel like newcomers.
    suefarrell.farrell@gmail.com

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  14. When I was a teacher, I had to transfer to a different school for my last 3 years. I really felt like a newcomer, even though I had the most seniority and age in the district. Never felt completely welcome, either. bobwiesmann (AT) gamil (DOT) com

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  15. About five years ago, I started working for a grain exporter, in an office of people all of whom had over 20 years of experience in the grain trade. I had previously been a bookseller. It was quite a learning curve! Thanks for the chance to win. aut1063(at)gmail(dot)com.

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  16. I know all too well about being a newcomer as a kid. We moved a lot...almost a new school every year. I think that's why I like to stay put as an adult. It's hard to be on the outside.
    awilcox1182@gmail.com

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  17. I know most think of a new place to live- but when forced to think of being the newbie, I think of my first day at my new job. Everyone is experienced, they know what they are doing, the process and all procedures and here I am new and the boss. Oye... Yes! I was the outsider. Thank goodness some wonderful souls took me under their wings.
    dndion@yahoo.com

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  18. When I entered the 7th grade, rather than attending the local high school, I attended a high school that accepted students from all parts of the city I did not know any of my classmates and it took some time to adjust to the larger school and changing classrooms each period.

    jtcgc at yahoo dot com

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  19. College was the first time having different kids in my classes/school. parkeremma2003 at yahoo dot com

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  20. Being a newcomer is very much affected by yourself and the people you encounter. The more you find yourself in that situation, the easier it gets, I think. I'm @ sawinla at hotmail dot com

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  21. We moved around a lot when I was a child. I was a newcomer more times than I would have wanted.


    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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  22. After College I moved many times and each time you had to start over...
    Marilyn ewatvess@yahoo.com

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  23. When I married my husband 32 years ago we both moved to an area that was good for both of us to be able to still work at the jobs we had. In my case it was and hour away from where I had lived all my life so I didn't know anyone or any of the areas there. I was always the newcomer, at church, my children's school(s), and even the area stores. It took quite a bit of time to get to know some people but I love our area and home here. robeader53(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  24. Our family moved around a lot while my husband was working and we found ourselves newcomers in Laramie, WY. It took us a few weeks to make friends, but have stayed close to dear friends there for over twenty years now. I learned that the best way to make a friend is to volunteer at something you like to do, so I would always volunteer at the library.
    Librarylady80(at)gmail(dot)com
    I have purchased and read all of your Ireland County Cork books, but not the Orchard ones. judy

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  25. I was a newcomer to the West Coast, after living in the Midwest most of my life. Now I'm an old hand at it, after 30 years! Thanks for a chance to win. I love this series!! ljbonkoski@yahoo.com

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  26. First I have to say I love this series. Ok on to being a newcomer. I moved to Indiana to start work in a different division with the same company. I had worked for my job for about 15 years and always with the same group of people. Only about 40 of us total. I moved to a group of more than 300. The good part, I went from mid-low seniority to high seniority. That worked great for me and helped me to make more friends, lol. I could get better shifts and better days off and so people wanted to switch. Having something to offer does help. kayt18 (at) comcast (dot) net

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  27. I have moved around several times but always found welcoming people who became friends. doward1952(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  28. Married in CA. Moved to Tenn. Mixed neighborhood. About 3 days after I moved in a couple of ladies arrived with a cake carrier. Asked if I was open to a get acquainted get together. I said I was. One gal turned and waved her arm. Half a dozen ladies started coming over. Couple from cars. One brought plastic silverware, another plates. My introduction to Hummingbird Cake. After a round of intros we had a blast. Best first time I had ever "endured" a nice fun intro. And I had endured some not so nice ones in the past. Della at deepotter (at) peoplepc (dot) com

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  29. It was different when we moved to California. Starting a new school and everything else. Shirley Robinson robinsontiger1@hotmail.com

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  30. I grew up in the middle of apple orchards in Northern New York state. They are a lot of work and they do require that work year round. After harvest and before the spring pruning is about the only slow time. Yes, they took advantage of it when they could. We have moved around since getting married. Much of the time we lived on base, which is a bit like moving back to your old neighborhood. You are likely to know many people in the neighborhood, so visiting, getting children together for play dates, and getting involved in community activities just sort of flows normally.

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