Thursday, January 3, 2019

Family Matters, plus #GIVEAWAY

By Reba Almeida from Maddie Day's Cozy Capers Book Group Mysteries - read down for a giveaway

Good day, readers. I am Mac Almeida's grandmother Reba. We live on Cape Cod, the whole family, nearly. I'm an old lady - in fact, a quite little old lady at four foot eleven - and I feel blessed to have kin gathered around.

Of course, Mac calls me Abo Ree. "Abo" is just how Cape Verdeans say "Grandma." Since my late husband emigrated as a child from those islands in the Atlantic off the coast of Senegal, my son Joseph speaks some Kriolu, too, and the term just stuck. Me, I'm as American as they come, retired from a career as a teacher in the Boston schools.

I'm so proud of Mac and the success of her Mac's Bikes shop. I even pop in and help out from time to time when she's short handed, at least when I'm not off at aqua aerobics, garden club, or all my other regular activities. I only live down the street, after all. One of my other activities is keeping track of shenanigans on Main Street with my spyglass. I've even been able to report a few bad guys to the Westham PD, too.

I'll tell you, I sure am glad Mac came through her latest adventure safe and alive. That crazy book group of hers started thinking they were in one of the mysteries they read! But she's fine. They all are. Well, you'll have to read the book herself to find out what happened.

Our author has a copy of the new book to give away. Tell me about your grandma, or another old lady in your life, now or from when you were younger (and include your email address). Good luck, kids!

Maddie Day creates the Country Store Mysteries and the Cozy Capers Book Group Mysteries. As Edith Maxwell, this Macavity- and Agatha-nominated author writes the Quaker Midwife Mysteries, the Local Foods Mysteries, and award-winning short crime fiction.

Maxwell is President of Sisters in Crime New England. She lives north of Boston with her beau and two cats, and blogs here and with the other Wicked Cozy Authors. You can find her on Facebook, twitter, Pinterest, and at her web site, edithmaxwell.com.

65 comments:

  1. I used to live next to a kind old woman who always went out of her way to help others. Sadly, she's gone now, but I will always remember her fondly. mbradeen [at] yahoo [dot] com

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  2. My Nana was always in my life. She taught me so much, from cooking to embroidery to gardening. She loved crossword puzzles, Jeopardy and always read mysteries!
    debprice60@gmail.com

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  3. We moved a lot so I did not see them a lot, but when I did, I felt so special.
    debby236@gmail.com

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  4. My grandmother had a very hard life. She not only raised her own kids, thirteen including three who died young, but many of her grandchildren as well. Up until she was in her eighties she still used an outhouse and bathed in a galvanized steel tub. Every year we would all gather at her place for Thanksgiving dinner. My favorite memory of her is the year before she passed away when I actually got to hear her play a song on her old pump organ

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  5. My mimi was one of the most upbeat, positive people I have ever known. I still miss her.
    browninggloria(at) hotmail(dot) com

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  6. My grandmother had eight children, most were raised during the depression. She had 25 grand children and many great grandchildren before she passed away. In her sixties she took a job as a crossing guard in our city. She would make sure the children got to school safely (lots of ambulances and semis going through the area) and she would crochet hats, gloves and scarves year round to give out to the children in the Winters. She raised me and taught me to cook, crochet, knit, embroider, and sew, along with tons of other life lessons. I miss her dearly, but think of her often and that makes her feel closer. cpfrick1@hotmail.com

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  7. Both of my grandmothers had 11 children and both of my grandfathers died young leaving them to raise them on their own. I was always amazed by my grandmothers as they did all this and never had a job. pgenest57(at)aol(dot)com

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  8. My children are blessed with a wonderful grandmother. My 91 year old mother-in-law still cooks the dishes she learned from her immigrant Italian mother, and she has taught my daughter to make those recipes, too. She loves going out to lunch with friends and going to the local casino. And, of course, she loves hearing every story about my grandson, her great grandson.

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  9. I only knew one grandmother. She was born in the late 1800's. She had 13 children and raised them with my grandfather. She loved to visit, eat ice cream and playing cards. I really after all these years.

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  10. Thank you for the opportunity to talk about my paternal grandmother, MaBushy. I know--weird name but my maiden name is Bush so it makes sense. :) MaBushy was born in 1902. She loved to dress to the max for her job everyday & taught me at a very early age to enjoy shopping in downtown Dallas. Oh the memories! She & I would ride the bus to downtown & shop at Woolworth's which was especially fun during Christmas because the lights & decorations were fabulous. She didn't like to cook so we ate out when I was lucky enough to spend time with her. She loved jewelry, make-up, perfume, mystery novels with a bit of romance, Bonnie & Clyde ( she liked to tell me stories of when Bonnie & Clyde were in the Dallas area) and fan magazines. She was just a lot of fun to be around. lnchudej@yahoo.com

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  11. I miss my grandmothers so much. I credit one of my grandmothers for teaching me to bake. I have a set of her measuring spoons hanging up in my kitchen and think of her every time I bake.
    donnaing1(at)gmail(dot)com

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  12. I love reading these comments about your families. I never got to know any of my grandparents. ckmbeg (at) gmail (dot) com

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  13. My Dad’d mother was a really good baker. When I was a kid she’d make apple strudel or pie. She’d let us make shapes out of the extra dough and she’d bake them for us.
    sgiden at verizon(.)net

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  14. Looks like it's going to be a great read. So hoping. My grandma was a character and a half. At 93 she was still walking to Safeway 7 blocks away and carrying home two sacks of groceries each week. She was an excellent cook made the best apple pies from her gravenstein apple tree. She would just take a pinch here, a pinch there, and we'd have the best meal ever. Never used a recipe. Fresh items, especially toms from her garden graced the table often. She taught me how to crochet, & knit. Love Jim Reeves and Slim Whitman. Loved the smell of her place in the winter. For heat she burned sawdust. My other grandma I never knew. She died in childbirth with her 9th child. My Mom was one of 9 children. Third to the youngest. deepotter (at) peoplepc (dot) com

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  15. My grandmother was widowed at 38 with 6 children. She was a talented cook and baker. She worked at a summer camp as the cook . She lived with our family for 7 years when she was older and had many grandchildren. I wish that I had the strength and talent which she had her entire life. She ruled the kitchen and was the boss.saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

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  16. My grandmother cleaned, cooked and baked into her old age. She was a wonderful cook and we went to her apartment every Saturday for a memorable lunch. Later on when she was too old and not well I still visited. She was on her own from a young age as her husband died young. I wish I was aware of her difficult life and how she strived and survived.

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  17. I love all these elder lady stories! Keep 'em coming!

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  18. I was lucky enough to be able to spend quality time with my grandparents when I was growing up. They lived in Philadelphia, and my grandmother made sure to take me to see the sights each time I visited. I loved going on the tram and subway with her to go window shopping at Wanamakers and Gimbels during the Christmas holidays (the decorations were amazing back in the 60s). I remember going to the movies with her to see "The Birds" and when we left the theatre we had to go through an area that was filled with pigeons on the ground and overhead. And another memory of her is her baking - pumpkin bundt cakes, anise cookies, etc. for the holidays. I miss her to this day.

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    1. Oops - left off my email - kuzlin(at)aol(dot)com

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  19. Petite woman rock! My daughter is 4'7". (She's of Peruvian Indian descent)
    Compact, without any unnecessary height!
    libbydodd at comcast dot net

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  20. I treasure the memorirs of my grandmother. She was an incredible seamstress. She woukd see a dress in a store window and go home and make a newspaper pattern of the exact dress and sew it. It would be grander than the stores.So much talent!!

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  21. My grandmother was a crocheter & made the best blonde brownies.
    turtle6422 at gmail dot com

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  22. A sweet memory of my husbands grandma is how she always had a bag of dog food and water in her car trunk in case she saw a stray animal. craig-kelley70(at)att(dot)net

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  23. I had two grandmas one on my dads side and one on my moms side I used to love hanging out with both of my grandmas but especially my grandma from my moms side she was Italian I used go over to her house when my parents were working she’d spoil me so much I miss both my grandmas and grandpa so much and I also miss going over to my grandma and grandpas house for Christmas dinner angelcake12@optonline.net

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  24. My mother-in-law was the sweetest old woman anyone could have met until dementia took her away from us. She loved spoiling her family with the wonderful baked goods she could make. Birthdays and Christmas were over the top where she was involved. She passed away two years ago and left a real void in our lives. robeader53(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  25. My grandmother was my favorite lady in the whole world-----I just loved to cook with her.
    suefarrell.farrell@gmail.com

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  26. I had two wonderful grandmothers, as well as 3 great aunts. One great aunt had no children and she was especially crazy about us kids. Legallyblonde1961@yahoo.com

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  27. My grandma lived in Alberta and we lived in Philadelphia so I didn’t get to see her very often. But when I did it was a lot of fun. She was German and spke with a strong German accent. We used to love to pick vegetables from her large garden.

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  28. Taylor R. WilliamsJanuary 3, 2019 at 2:31 PM

    I miss my maternal grandma - she was a smart, funny and vibrant person who was ahead of her time. She passed away in 98 at the age of 85. She was single from the time I was 3, her alcoholic husband passed away. When she reached mandatory retirement age, she started a dog sitting business in either 1978 or 1979, long before that would be common.

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  29. My grandma is amazing! She loves to give back and be needed by those she loves. She has the BEST humor and always gets me into trouble when we're together. It's great! cherryredh2@aol.com

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  30. I only knew one of my grandmas and she was great! I work with lots of older folks, so have lots of great stories about older people, but my most favorite old people were two sisters who befriended me on my internship. They took me under their wings and became like grandmas to me. They were the youngest old people I knew! Miss they so much!

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  31. I loved my Grandma so much and have such great memories of her. She always baked me an apple pie when we visited. She raised chickens but gave one chicken each to have as pets at her place. Her hugs were the best! I miss her so much!
    bernice-kennedy(at)sbcglobal(dot)net

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  32. I never got to meet my grandmothers as they were deceased before I was born. My parents and brothers shared stories about them, and at times I felt as though I actually knew them. I am named after them so they have a very special place in my heart.

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  33. Now I'm the old lady in my life! I even look a bit like my Grandma. I was very lucky growing up next door to one set of grandparents and less than 2 miles from the other one. One Grandma showed me how to sew and knit - she could do anything with her hands - and my other Grandma gave me the love of reading! As I said, very lucky, and I hope one day my grandkids remember me as fondly. jmpurcel at hotmail dot net.

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  34. My grandmother raised my dad on her own. She kept him on the straight and narrow. She worked hard and made sure my dad had a good work ethic. She could make a dollar go further than anyone I have known. I never saw her wear anything other than a skirt or dress. I have the knit hats she always wore. She was so much fun!
    skforrest1957(at)gmail(dot)com

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  35. I remember my Grandmother coming over for dinner every Sunday and taking the bus with my Mom to visit her. When I was in school I used to go house for lunch and after school because she lived right by the school. I was lucky that I was able to spend so much time with my Grandmother.
    diannekc8(at)gmail(dot)com

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  36. My grandparents had passed away before my folks met and married. I didn't realized what I had missed until I had children of my own. They had 2 sets of grands and 2 great grands(my husbands side). They were so blessed. My mother in law is the only grand left. She is 97. My cousins mother in law lived with him and his wife for many years but as a child I was very shy and didn't make up to her easily. Something I am very sorry for now. nettiem(at)toledotel(dot)com

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  37. My grandmother has been gone for a long time, but when I was little she used to watch us and our cousins. Later on when I got married and had my own daughter she was still around and got to meet my daughter and a few of her great grand kids. I remember my daughter being almost as tall as her at a very young age helping her get around. My grandma used to love giving her coins since it gave her joy to see my daughter happy. It was a great time in our lives

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  38. My friend who is turning 70 this year is like a grandmother to me. I enjoy spending time with her. Thanks for the chance. Maceoindo(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  39. My grandmother was part Ojibwa, part French Canadian, and part Irish! She was an amazing cook who taught us kids French by hollering 'Venis ici toute de suite maintenent" and we'd come running. We didn't know about the Ojibwa part until after she died, because she thought it was something to be hid.

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  40. I have to say there not been any grandma in my life really. My grandma I only know for a couple of years. And I only talk to her on the phone once a week. But she was great. She pass away 2 years ago. I miss talking to her.

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  41. When I was young, my brothers, sister and I would stay with my grandmother for 2 weeks every summer. Grandma would take us to the beach where we would help in the cafe that was staffed by veterans. We had a great time!

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  42. My great grandmother or, as I called her, my little Masey-girl. I loved spending time with her. She treated me like a big person, talking to me and listening to me. She made me feel important. She also introduced me to coffee via coffee milk. She lived to 100 years. I still miss my little Masey-girl.

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  43. My Oma was amazing. I didn't get to meet her until I was 7 and we went to Germany. During WWII she made sure all of her family, including my mother and the whole train car they were on lived as they were forced out of the Sudatland and back to Germany. And because she was Gypsy (turned in by her mother-in-law) they were put in a concentration camp as the war ended. She spoke 7 languages and was able to be released with her children if she worked at translating. When I met her she and my Opa had a little farm with cows, chickens and pigs. She did all the hard work. Even as she aged she still walked the milk to the corner for pickup. She was so amazing and a wonderful cook and baker. Thank you for the chance to win. kayt18 (at) comcast (dot) net

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  44. My grandma was raised in hard times and had to care for her siblings, and the household. Even make clothes smaller for her brother that w ere her fathers. Even a disabled baby sister. Then during the depression she raised her children. Her mom died when she was in 5 th grade. She was wonderful to me always encouraging and even helped me train my horse although she didn’t ride. She never went swimming or had much fun. Always big gardens and knitting so busy. Plus she worked outside the house when my grandpa had a heart attack and retired. She was a awesome cook and was always there for me. Thank you for the chance donakutska7@gmail.com

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  45. My memere passed away when I was 8 years old, so my memories aren't vast but what I do remember is her kindness, her infectious laugh, her love of reading and crocheting, and her candy dish. I wish I would've had more years with her, but I treasure my memories and old pictures. toniann40@verizon.net

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  46. I grew up with my grandparents and my grandmother was the first in many things: she was one of the first females to become aa financial secretary at a carpenter's union, first to become a an delegate to one of their conventions, and the longest to remain in her position after her 70th birthday! She helped mold me to being a strong person in my own rite.
    teddi1961(at)arcemont(dot)com

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  47. My maternal grandmother lived with us from when she was about sixty. She had one child still at home...her menopause surprise...she survived, the influenza epidemic, ( born in 1898), the depression, raised two of her children on her own after leaving an abusive marriage...and had the most beautiful legs. Seriously... in her nineties she had the legs of a model,or movie star. She also loved,shoes. Yep...she could get upset, angry...but laid things on the line. When my first marriage fell,apart... she came back with me to my house nd helped me pack up the children’s belongings and mine so we could move to a place I could afford she told me, honey, cry all you want at night, but in the day, you just have to pack it up and go on. Life doesn’t end when your husband cheats, or dies.but so be strong for the little ones, and let it out when they are in bed. Her pioneer spirit of packing it up and moving on is like ww2’s “ pull up your big girl knickers and get on with it,” or “ suck it up” as might be said today. She was strong.. she had breast cancer back in the fifties when she was 50... went to City of Hope in California, and lived till age 94. My parents were good parents as well, but grandma ...well we had fun...and some of her stories were heartbreaking, some were full of humour...she used to I. Her old age that each day she woke up on the right side of the grave was good.....one crazy thing she did that I would never do...is test food that had been sitting in the refrigerator to see if it was still good...she’d LOOK, if no mould visible, she’d sniff, if it passed that test, she’d then taste it to see if it tasted ok. Not me.. Lorrie, I’ve been married to this man for 45:years and we still disagree on left overs. I will save in fridge for another meal but the time limit is up to 5 days...if it’s not eaten by then, it gets dumped..wasteful or not. Grandma, would also take old bread and pinch off any mold and then make a sandwich with it....I believe it was that generation and the generation that were children in the depression....they became frugal,with food. It did matter that we now had the means to buy or make bread anytime we chose....the habit had just been ingrained.

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  48. My paternal grandma lived with us and shared a bedroom with me from when I was 3 until I was 6, when she passed away. She also watched my brother and me while my mom worked. When I was 5, my mom, grandma, brother and I took the train from Chicago to California to visit my uncle and his family. One of my favorite memories of her is seeing how happy she was holding my baby sister. Thanks for the chance. ematov (at) comcast (dot) net

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  49. My grandmother was born in 1900 and lived to be 107. She taught me how to sew, she made her own soap, and took me on vacations. She could grow anything, and had a huge garden. She was awesome.

    kaye.killgore@comcast.net

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  50. The only grandmother that I knew was my step grandma and she moved away after my granddaddy passed away when I was young. I do remember her as a sweet and loving lady.
    gda523(at)comcast(dot)com

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  51. My grandmother was a wonderful lady who taught me to bake desserts with rhubarb from her garden! She and my grandfather were married in 1920 and took an old car on a camping honeymoon out west when there were no interstates. One day a pilot landed his two seat plane in their Kansas pasture to repair it and then gave each of them a ride in the plane. Grandma raised four children and saw two of them go off to WW II (including my mom, who was an army nurse.) Grandma and Grandpa were married for fifty years and even after his death the next year, she continued to live on their farm by herself for some years. She made the prettiest quilts and loved her 12 grandchildren and her beautiful flower garden.

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  52. I was lucky enough to have both of my grandmothers nearby while I was growing up! They both even attended my wedding! I still have my 84 year old mother living near me too! lindaherold999(at)gmail.com

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  53. I didn't know my grandparents, but an older lady named Harriet rented me my first ever place, and she was like a grandmother or second mother to me. She invited me over for lunch a couple times a week and taught me a lot. Thanks for the chance. JL_Minter (at) hotmail (dot) com

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    Replies
    1. Jaime, random.org picked you! Please check your email.

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    2. Thanks so much! I replied to your email!!!

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  54. I rarely saw either of my grandmothers. We lived so far away. They both always sent me the prettiest birthday cards though. I still have some of them.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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  55. Random picked Jaime Minter! Congratulations, Jaime! Please check your email.

    I loved all these grandma/old lady stories, and wish I had a book for each of you.

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  56. My Grandmother was a wonderful woman who farmed. We spent every summer with her. doward1952(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  57. One of my grandmothers died before I was born and the other one died when I was very young.

    Kit3247(at)aol(dot)com

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  58. My great grandma (GG) was the best. I always had so much fun with her playing tea parties (With her real tea set) and cards. anajs95 at gmail dot com

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  59. No grandmothers but we had a Great Aunt who lived across the Street. She was everything a grandmother would be.I still miss her she was so good to us.

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  60. Jean602 Nancy Burgess
    jean60212@gmail.com

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  61. My grandparents were a big part of my life growing up and that's something I am very grateful for. I was lucky enough to be able to see them as often as I wanted. Email - bluetothebone@hotmail.com

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