Sunday, February 3, 2019

A Busy Election from Rose Carroll, plus #GIVEAWAY

My name is Rose Carroll, from Edith Maxwell's Quaker Midwife Mysteries. My author wishes to tell thee she will send one of thee a copy of Turning the Tide, which has recently been nominated for an Agatha Award for Best Historical Mystery.

I know thee has not heard from me in quite some time. I have been terribly occupied with this year's presidential election. My dear friend Bertie Winslow persuaded me to become involved with the Woman Suffrage Association of Amesbury and their protest on Election Day.

I was delighted that my mother traveled from Lawrence to join the fight, and astonished that Elizabeth Cady Stanton herself came to support us.

But when the group's leader was murdered, it was as far from from a delight as I could imagine, especially since it was I who encountered her body. Finding who did the dastardly deed was not easy, and I myself was the subject of an attack. I blessedly survived, although it was not without consequence. But police detective Kevin Donovan and I did prevail and live to tell the tale.

Friend Edith wishes me to ask thee what your most memorable Election Day was, whether it was the first time thee registered thy vote or another particularly remarkable experience at the polls. I might add that thee is extraordinarily blessed to have this privilege, one not available to me. She will happily send one of thee a copy of the book, the third in the series, so please include thy email address (whatever that might signify).

She also wants me to tell thee that Charity's Burden, book #4, will be out in April and can be pre-ordered.

Maddie Day creates the Country Store Mysteries and the Cozy Capers Book Group Mysteries. As Edith Maxwell, this Macavity- and Agatha-nominated author writes the Quaker Midwife Mysteries, the Local Foods Mysteries, and award-winning short crime fiction.

Maxwell lives north of Boston with her beau and two cats, and blogs here and with the other Wicked Authors. You can find her on Facebook, twitter, Instagram, and at her web site, edithmaxwell.com.

25 comments:

  1. Many years ago, before I could vote, I was at the YM-YWHA. There was a polling station there. We heard that Pierre Trudeau was there to vote. We went and waited outside the room. When he came out, we got to say "hello" and shake his hand. He won that day and became our Prime Minister.

    flash29[at]teksavvy[dot]com

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  2. I found voting in my new state of residence to be quite different. After voting in a school for many years, I voted in a church and could not figure out how todo everything.debby236 at gmail dot com

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  3. I remember waiting in a long line out side and a police came so no one got in line after eight pm. I hope people vote next election.donakutska7@gmail.com

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  4. The memory I have is the day I went to the voting office and officially became a legal voter for the first time. For some reason, being sworn in brought tears to my eyes.

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  5. Remember how proud my mother talking about being able to vote.I still go to vote at a polling place to feel the energy.ruthenixon29 archival for net

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  6. When I first voted it felt wonderful. This was when I was living in Mtl. and voted at the small elementary school across the street from where I lived. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

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  7. I was working for a judge in Domestic Relations/Bureau of Support back when I was old enough to be able to cast my first vote. My parent's had never voted up until that point. Since the election involved the judge I worked for they registered to vote. I always told them that if you don't vote you can't complain. It is rewarding to talk with my children about the various candidates and issues that are on the ballot. I love Edith Maxwell and all of her books and series. robeader53(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  8. My dad worked as an election judge one year and we went with my mom when she voted to visit him. Voting seemed so exciting with a huge metal machine with curtains and levers galore! Imagine my slight disappointment when I finally voted with what was essentially a scantron sheet like school tests! Thanks for the chance to win!
    JHolden955(at)gmail(dot)com

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  9. My daughter turned 18 just in time to register to vote for Barack Obama. She was absolutely thrilled.
    libbydodd at comcast dot net

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  10. I remember the year that it was so unusually warm on election day that we voted and then went golfing.
    suefarrell.farrell@gmail.com

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  11. First election I remember was as a very small child. Possibly 4 or 5. I went with my grandmother, who was raising more at the time. I tener stepping behind the dark curtain, and looking at this huge machine with knobs. It was so impressive, the memory has stayed with me all this time. meg85242 at gmail dot com.

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    1. Meg, you are our lucky winner! Congratulations. Please send your snail mail address to me at edith@edithmaxwell.com. Thanks!

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  12. I remember standing in line many times after work to vote. Now there is early voting, but I prefer to go to the polls on voting day. It's interesting to see how voting has changed over the years.
    diannekc8(at)gmail(dot)com

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  13. My very first time to vote was when I was a kid. They brought in a couple of voting machines to school so we could all vote like our parents. I remember being very excited.
    turtle6422 at gmail dot com

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  14. Taylor R. WilliamsFebruary 3, 2019 at 6:43 PM

    My first time voting felt like I was doing my duty. Thank you for the contest. trwilliams 69 (at)msn (dot) com

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  15. I still remember how proud I was the first time I was old enough to vote in a presidential election. It felt great!
    cecilialyoung at gmail dot com

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  16. I was so excited that first time I could vote. It was the very first time 18 year olds could vote and I had just turned 18. It was a presidental election too. The candidate I voted for didn't win but I proud to contribute to the democracy. Thanks for the chance.
    ematov (at) comcast (dot) net

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  17. The first time I voted, I voted early before going to college. I was the first voter at my hometown precinct!

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  18. One year, I had to take my oldest son with me. He was young at the time - well, too young to be left alone at home anyway. We talked about elections and the importance of voting on the way there. He even had to come into the booth with me (like I was going to leave him standing outside - NOT). All in all it seemed a very practical 'history' lesson that day!

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  19. Probably the first time I voted when I was in college. JL_Minter@hotmail.com

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  20. The very first time I voted I felt the enormity of it.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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  21. Meg85242 is our lucky winner! Congratulations, Meg. Please send your snail mail address to me at edith@edithmaxwell.com. I wish I had a book for everyone.

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