Sunday, September 29, 2019

Antique Toys as Objects D’art


Character: Liz McCall
Series: Vintage Toyshop Mysteries
Author: Barbara Early


When it comes to vintage toys, most collectors focus on toys they knew as children. They’re looking for Star Wars or Masters of the Universe. Or sometimes My Little Pony, as a certain local private eye does, but you didn’t hear it from me.

But when it comes to antique toys, it’s often more about the look. And weathered and rustic is in.
Lothar Spurzem [CC BY-SA 2.0 de
(https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/de/deed.en)]

Antique toys have become popular objects d’art. 

Interior designers come into the store all the time looking for just the right thing to place on shelves and in curio cabinets in vintage or farmhouse homes. They especially scarf up hobby horses, old tin toys, pull toys, and matrioshkas. I’ve seen them frame a montage of paper dolls. 

Dosseman [CC BY-SA 4.0
(https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)]
Occasionally they buy creepy porcelain dolls (shudder), but at least it gets them out of the store.

When considering adding a toy to your home decorating, there are some things you might wish to keep in mind to protect your investment and safety.  Toys automatically attract children, so make sure that you keep little fingers away from antiques which do not often measure up to today’s stricter safety standards. Antique toys might have sharp edges, small parts, pinch points, or be made from unacceptable levels of lead or decorated with lead paint.

Thomas Quine [CC BY 2.0
(https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)]
Beyond that, there are no rules. Use your imagination and buy something that appeals to you!

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